Mr. Justice Raffles

By: Hornung, E. W.

Price: $10.00

Quantity: 1 available

Book Condition: Very Good


No jacket. Boards rubbed, ink names on front free endpaper. 1909 Hard Cover. 313 pp. Arthur J. Raffles is a character created in the 1890s by E. W. Hornung, brother-in-law to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Raffles is is a gentleman thief, living at a prestigious address in London, playing cricket and supporting himself by carrying out ingenious burglaries. Mr. Justice Raffles is a 1909 novel written by E.W. Hornung. It featured his popular character A. J. Raffles a well-known cricketer and gentleman thief. It was the fourth and last in his four Raffles books which had begun with The Amateur Cracksman in 1899.[1] Mr. Justice Raffles is a 1909 novel written by E.W. Hornung. It featured his popular character A. J. Raffles a well-known cricketer and gentleman thief. It was the fourth and last in his four Raffles books which had begun with The Amateur Cracksman in 1899.[1] At the end of Hornung's second Raffles short story collection The Black Mask, Raffles and his companion Bunny Manders volunteer for service in the Second Boer War in 1899 where he was killed at the hands of the Boers. Hornung had intended this as a patriotic finale to his hero's story. However there was great popular demand for the return of the character, and a number of generous publishing offers, and Hornung agreed to write another book. In this he has been compared to Arthur Conan Doyle's decision to resurrect Sherlock Holmes after disposing of the character in The Final Problem; however, unlike Doyle's revelation that Holmes had actually survived the plunge over Reichenbach Falls, Hornung set Mr. Justice Raffles before the events of the Boer War. The comparison between the resurrections of Holmes and Raffles is made interesting by the fact that Doyle and Hornung were brothers-in-law. Indeed, prior to officially resurrecting Holmes, Doyle had used much the same technique with The Hound of the Baskervilles, his first post-Reichenbach Holmes story. In this he has been compared to Arthur Conan Doyle's decision to resurrect Sherlock Holmes after disposing of the character in The Final Problem; however, unlike Doyle's revelation that Holmes had actually survived the plunge over Reichenbach Falls, Hornung set Mr. Justice Raffles before the events of the Boer War. The comparison between the resurrections of Holmes and Raffles is made interesting by the fact that Doyle and Hornung were brothers-in-law. Indeed, prior to officially resurrecting Holmes, Doyle had used much the same technique with The Hound of the Baskervilles, his first post-Reichenbach Holmes story. In this he has been compared to Arthur Conan Doyle's decision to resurrect Sherlock Holmes after disposing of the character in The Final Problem; however, unlike Doyle's revelation that Holmes had actually survived the plunge over Reichenbach Falls, Hornung set Mr. Justice Raffles before the events of the Boer War. The comparison between the resurrections of Holmes and Raffles is made interesting by the fact that Doyle and Hornung were brothers-in-law. Indeed, prior to officially resurrecting Holmes, Doyle had used much the same technique with The Hound of the Baskervilles, his first post-Reichenbach Holmes story. In this he has been compared to Arthur Conan Doyle's decision to resurrect Sherlock Holmes after disposing of the character in The Final Problem; however, unlike Doyle's revelation that Holmes had actually survived the plunge over Reichenbach Falls, Hornung set Mr. Justice Raffles before the events of the Boer War. The comparison between the resurrections of Holmes and Raffles is made interesting by the fact that Doyle and Hornung were brothers-in-law. Indeed, prior to officially resurrecting Holmes, Doyle had used much the same technique with The Hound of the Baskervilles, his first post-Reichenbach Holmes story. In this he has been compared to Arthur Conan Doyle's decision to resurrect Sherlock Holmes after disposing of the character in The Final Problem; however, unlike Doyle's revelation that Holmes had actually survived the plunge over Reichenbach Falls, Hornung set Mr. Justice Raffles before the events of the Boer War. The comparison between the resurrections of Holmes and Raffles is made interesting by the fact that Doyle and Hornung were brothers-in-law. Indeed, prior to officially resurrecting Holmes, Doyle had used much the same technique with The Hound of the Baskervilles, his first post-Reichenbach Holmes story. The title contains a more direct reference to Holmes, being a parody of Mr. Justice Holmes - that is, the American jurist (and later Supreme Court Justice) Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., one of the many inspirations for the great detective. Its reception was mixed, with some fans lamenting the loss of the carefree gentlemen thief of the early stories. It was the last Raffles work written by Hornung, although a number of continuations have been written by other authors in a mixture of parody and homage.

Title: Mr. Justice Raffles

Author: Hornung, E. W.

Categories: Mystery & Thriller, British & Irish,

Edition: Reissue

Publisher: New York, Grosset & Dunlap: 1909

Binding: Hard Cover

Book Condition: Very Good

Jacket Condition: No Jacket

Seller ID: 2302632

Keywords: FICTION MYSTERY DETECTIVE ARTHUR J RAFFLES SIR ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE BROTHER IN LAW E W HORNUNG LITERATURE BRITISH,