The Diary of Samuel Pepys: A New and Complete Transcription, in Eleven Volumes -- 1660; 1661; 1662; 1663; 1664; 1665; 1666; 1667; 1668-9; Companion; Index


All volumes in original plastic wrap. 1970 Hard Cover. Complete in eleven hardcover volumes. 8vo. Samuel Pepys is as much a paragon of literature as Chaucer and Shakespeare. His Diary is one of the principal sources for many aspects of the history of its period. In spite of its significance, all previous editions were inadequately edited and suffered from a number of omissions—until Robert Latham and William Matthews went back to the 300-year-old original manuscript and deciphered each passage and phrase, no matter how obscure or indiscreet. The Diary deals with some of the most dramatic events in English history. Pepys witnessed the London Fire, the Great Plague, the Restoration of Charles II, and the Dutch Wars. He was a patron of the arts, having himself composed many delightful songs and participated in the artistic life of London. His flair for gossip and detail reveals a portrait of the times that rivals the most swashbuckling and romantic historical novels. In none of the earlier versions was there a reliable, full text, with commentary and notation with any claim to completeness. This edition, first published in 1970, is the first in which the entire diary is printed with systematic comment. This is the only complete edition available; it is as close to Pepys's original as possible. Samuel Pepys was an English naval administrator and Member of Parliament, who is now most famous for the diary he kept for a decade while still a relatively young man. Although Pepys had no maritime experience, he rose by patronage, hard work and his talent for administration, to be the Chief Secretary to the Admiralty under both King Charles II and subsequently King James II. His influence and reforms at the Admiralty were important in the early professionalisation of the Royal Navy. The detailed private diary Pepys kept from 1660 until 1669 was first published in the 19th century, and is one of the most important primary sources for the English Restoration period. It provides a combination of personal revelation and eyewitness accounts of great events, such as the Great Plague of London, the Second Dutch War and the Great Fire of London. The diary was written in one of the many standard forms of shorthand used in Pepys's time, in this case called Tachygraphy and devised by Thomas Shelton. Though it is clear from its content that it was written as a purely personal record of his life and not for publication, there are indications Pepys actively took steps to preserve the bound manuscripts of his diary. Apart from writing it out in fair copy from rough notes, he also had the loose pages bound into six volumes, catalogued them in his library with all his other books, and must have known that eventually someone would find them interesting.

Title: The Diary of Samuel Pepys: A New and Complete Transcription, in Eleven Volumes -- 1660; 1661; 1662; 1663; 1664; 1665; 1666; 1667; 1668-9; Companion; Index

Author: Pepys, Samuel; Latham, Robert; Matthews, William; Armstrong, William A.; Emslie, Macdonald; Millar, Oliver; Reddaway, T.F.

Categories: British, Literary & Intellectual,

Publisher: The University of California Press: 1970

Binding: Hard Cover

Book Condition: Fine

Jacket Condition: Fine

Seller ID: 2265951

Keywords: BIOGRAPHY SAMUEL PEPYS DIARY CLASSICS,