Dart Maintenance & Repair Guide for 1970-1976 Models, Demon, Swinger (Motor)

By: Forier, Louis C. (Editor)

Price: $15.00

Quantity: 1 available

Book Condition: Good


Light shelf wear, light smudging on title page. Binding tight. Includes black & white photographs. 1977 Hard Cover. 140 pp. Trouble Diagnosis Guide 64 pp. The Dodge Dart was an automobile built by the Dodge division of the Chrysler Corporation from 1960 to 1976. The Dart was introduced as a lower-priced, shorter wheelbase, full-size Dodge in 1960 and 1961, became a mid-size car for 1962, and finally was a compact between 1963 and 1976. Dodge also used the Dart name for a Ghia-built show car in the 1950s. The Dart was refreshed for 1970 with front and rear changes designed to bring the car closer to the design themes found in Dodge’s full-size vehicles through grille and contour changes. In the rear, the Dart’s new rectangular tail lights were set into a wedge-shaped rear bumper design continuing the angled trailing edge of the new deck lid and quarter panels. The revised rear styling cut trunk space almost in half compared to the 1969 model. 14-inch wheels became standard equipment, and the 170 in³ Slant-6 was replaced by a larger 198 in³ version for improved base-model performance and greater manufacturing economy (since the 198 shared a block with the 225, while the 170 had used its own block). Changes to the fuel system improved driveability, economy and emission control. Part-throttle downshift was added to the 8-cylinder automatic transmissions. In compliance with FMVSS 108, sidemarker lights and reflectors were installed at all four corners. A number of other changes were made to the Dart line for 1970 in order to avoid internal competition with Dodge's new ponycar, the Challenger. The convertible was discontinued along with the optional 383 and 440 cubic-inch V8 options, leaving the small-block 275-horsepower 340 four-barrel V8 as the top Dart engine. The sole performance model in the Dart line for 1970 was the Swinger 340 two-door hardtop. Beginning in 1971, the Swinger name was applied to the high line two-door hardtop (formerly the Custom) while the base hardtop was called the Swinger Special. The single taillamps of 1970 were given over to the badge-engineered Plymouth Valiant Scamp, while the 1971 Dart received new dual taillamps that would be used through the 1973 model year. Also in 1971 Dodge also gained a version of Plymouth's popular Valiant-based fastback Duster, called the Demon. As was the case with previous Dodge rebadges of Plymouth Valiants (e.g. the 1961-1962 Dodge Lancer), sales of the Demon lagged behind those of the Duster. Arguably, the Demon was the better looking car and had an aggressive look reminiscent of the 1970 Swinger 340. With optional hood scoops and black-out hood treatment, the car advertised that it meant trouble. The 275hp 340cid V8 backed up that statement. The Demon's mismatched 'Dart' front fender wheel lips and 'Duster' rear wheel fender lips illustrate how quickly this new model was created. The Demon's tail lights had been intended for the 1971 Plymouth Duster 340 (they match the 1971 Duster 340 grille), but quickly given to Dodge to differentiate its new car from the similar Plymouth. The Swinger 340, Dart's performance model, was replaced by the Demon 340 for 1971. Chrysler Canada, though, did build a small number of 1971 Swinger 340 hardtops based on the Swinger Special for two dealers in Western Canada. Physical changes to the 1972 Demon 340 came in the form of a different grille shared with the entire Dart line-up, new for 1972 side market lights which were no longer countersunk into the car's flanks, a more mundane dash cluster featuring a large rectangular speedometer and several small round gauges and new metal Demon fender-badges that no longer contained the small devil character from the decals used in 1971. The Demon decal on the rear of the car still did. 1972 also debuted a new optional single hood scoop for the Demon 340 that replaced the dual scoops from 1971 and was coupled with a stylish hood paint/black-out that had been standard on the Demon Sizzler model from the year before. Cars optioned up with the Rallye styled wheels now came with new nut styled center caps finished in a light argent silver paint. For 1973 the Demon fastback was renamed Dart Sport, in response to certain Christian groups' complaints about the Demon name and devil-with-pitchfork logo. The big-engined fastbacks thus became Dart Sport 340 in 1973, and Dart Sport 360 for 1974 when the 360 in³ (5.9 L) V8 replaced the 340 in³ (5.6 L) V8. 1973 models gained more massive front bumpers to comply with new federal regulations, as well as side-impact guard beams in the doors and new emission control devices. New single-piston disc brakes replaced the more complex 4-piston units offered from 1965 to 1972, though Chrysler did not address the premature rear-wheel lockup that continued to plague disc brake equipped Darts. Chrysler's robust new electronic ignition system was standard equipment with all engines, and starter motors were revised for faster engine cranking. New for 1973 was the Dart Sport Convertriple, basically a Dart Sport with a fold down rear seat and a manual sunroof. It was advertised as Three Cars In One including an economy compact, a convertible alternative with the sunroof and a roomy station wagon-alternative thanks to a fold down rear seat. The fastback roofline and fold down rear seat were similar in concept to two other Chrysler Corporation vehicles of the past including the glassback 1964-66 Plymouth Barracuda and the original 1966-67 Dodge Charger. In 1974, the US federal 5 mph bumper impact standards were extended to cover rear bumpers as well as front ones; as a result the Dart's rear bumper grew much more massive. Taillights larger than the previous year's items were set above the rear bumper, rather than within it. Shoulder and lap belts were finally unitized into a retractable, inertia-sensitive Uni-belt, replacing the difficult-to-use separate belts that had been installed through 1973. The Dart and its Plymouth Valiant/Duster clone led the American compact car market during the early 1970s. Their already-strong popularity was bolstered by the Arab oil embargo of 1973, which caused gasoline shortages with long lines at stations and dramatic price increases at the pump. To capitalize on an emerging trend toward luxurious compact cars, Dodge introduced the Dart SE (Special Edition) in mid-1974 as a four-door sedan and two-door hardtop. The SE included velour high back bucket seats with folding armrest, carpeted door panels, woodgrain instrument panel and deluxe wheel covers along with a TorqueFlite automatic transmission as standard equipment. Aside from a new grille, the 1975 models were virtually identical to the 1974s, except that California and certain high-altitude models were equipped with catalytic converters and so required unleaded gasoline. A 4-speed manual transmission was offered for the first time with a 6-cylinder engine since 1965, and with a new overdrive 4th gear ratio. A special-image model of the Dart Sport, the Dart Sport Hang Ten, featured surf-themed graphics. In 1976, several special models were offered. The Dart was made available with a police package, with production code A38. The A38 Dart had the highest-specification components and systems throughout, including a heavy-duty suspension with a rear sway bar and firmer shocks, larger brakes with semi-metallic front disc pads, maximum engine cooling, and high-capacity alternator and battery. The engine was Chrysler's 360 in³ (5.9 L) V8, with an A727 TorqueFlite transmission. Police-specific equipment such as a calibrated speedometer and high-intensity dome light were standard equipment, and an A-pillar spotlight and push bars were optional. Production totals were low,with most police agencies ordering the larger Dodge Coronet. The Dart Sport got several special variants for 1976. In a tie-in with the American bicentennial celebration, a Spirit of '76 edition was released featuring white paint with prominent red and blue bodyside striping meant to evoke the image of the American flag. And with fuel economy becoming more of a concern, a special Dart Lite was released. This was a Dart Sport made as light as possible with an aluminum hood, trunk bracing and bumper brackets, an aluminum intake manifold on the 225 in³ Slant-6 engine for the first time since 1960, specially-calibrated carburetor and distributor, extra-tall rear axle ratio, and TorqueFlite automatic or the A833 4-speed manual transmission. The Dart Lite and its sister model, the Plymouth Feather Duster, were rated at an impressive 36 mpg highway with a manual transmission. For the Dart's final year of 1976, front disc brakes became standard equipment and a new foot-operated parking brake replaced the under-dash T-handle unit that had been used since the Dart's 1963 introduction as a compact car. Over the Dart's total production run, the Dart earned a reputation as a dependable and bulletproof car. Ultimately, the Dart was replaced by the Dodge Aspen beginning in late spring of 1976 -- a replacement Chrysler President Lee Iacocca would later lament due to the Aspen's many early quality problems. -- Wikipedia

Title: Dart Maintenance & Repair Guide for 1970-1976 Models, Demon, Swinger (Motor)

Author: Forier, Louis C. (Editor)

Categories: Reference, Transportation, Technology, Automotive,

Publisher: Motor: 1977

Binding: Hard Cover

Book Condition: Good

Jacket Condition: No Jacket

Seller ID: 2197880

Keywords: CAR MAINTENANCE REPAIR MANUAL OLD MODELS 70S 1970S SEVENTIES CLASSIC AUTOMOBILE TECHNOLOGY REFERENCE TRANSPORATION MOTOR,